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20131202
20131210
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
extensive the national security agency really is. they have spent years spying on online gamers, including those playing on world of workout. in obamacare architect ezekiel emanuel says people haven't signed up for coverage because the obama administration has not sufficiently promoted it. my next guest says he couldn't write a greater piece of fiction in the obamacare narrative. we are joined now by best-selling author in his latest book. i was going to make a remark about a number of things. i will constrain myself. ezekiel emanuel, saying if you really want to keep your doctor, the obama deal is just to pay up. >> so what is he telling us? in obamacare works if you're rich. so if you're rich, you get to have choices and we heard that certain high and technologically advanced hospitals are being dropped off of all these insurance plans. and again, don't get access to the doctor you wanted the best health care system you can possibly have unless you are rich and that is the bottom line, which is a stunner coming from the high progressives to. >> the idea, that these hospitals would be exc
at the national security agency are not just intercepting calls but also tracking the movements of phones around the world. the paper cites documents leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden. it says agents collect 5 billion records every day on cell phones across the planet. the report says agents use that information to track people of interest and identify their associates. u.s. government officials say nsa personnel are trying to prevent terrorism and only monitoring non-americans. >>> the pris tij ous hotel in prag has turned a secret cold war underground bunker into a tourist destination. the aim is to show visitors how it was once used as a center for spy operations. the alta hotel recently opened the bunker to mark its 55th anniversary. during the cold war the luxury hotel was a popular destination for both western tourists and journalists. hidden 20 meters under ground it can only be reached by ladder. a hotel official says only a few knew it ever existed. on display is some original spy equipment such as a tape recorder for listening on each of the hotel's 94 rooms, also a floor
his game time, kudos to you, surveillance nerve. it says national security agency world of war craft, tony. >> thank you have a, shutting down the country arps main state news agency, the new agency will promote russia's image around the world. heading all of this, someone who is openly 18th gay. peter sharp the reports from moscow. >> this isn't just any news agency, it's one of the biggest in the world. it's got bureaus in 30 countries. one of the main sponsors of the sochi facilities. so was this expected? well, not according to local journalists at the organization. first they knew was when the news came on the kremlin's website and a man chosen to run the organization, that's dimitri krisiliof, he is a well-known anchor, talk show host, often venomous comments, very antigay, very antiopposition, very antiamerican. and his appointment will be seen basically i think as a further example of putin and the kremlin putting pressure on a very already heavily regulated media. >> cancer researchers release stunning results in the fight against leukemia. saturday the university of pennsyl
been the envy of america's national security agency the sites according to investigative journalist duncan campbell i'm sweet and always have allowed recruitment intelligence relationship with food waste during the years the cold war i'm a fiend tend to secretly in. to the club hosts the big spots in which they all thought this would be nice to get to that prime minister in return for betraying the tennessean secure a whole austin ate those and many of their own citizens. sweden was the largest collaborate to europe with the internet typing program run by the fine arts group of english speaking countries um and it said it does so because of its direct access the cables to the baltic and it's no surprise that the chp and nsa would want that as well as everything else is that they can take from st despite the criticism some governments protect their spine programs is something essential day this week the editor of britain's got the new sky to face questioning by and pains he believes that the publishing it's nice that the nation's put a dent in national security. jenna's claim eighty
council, and with the pentagon. this country it's included downing street, the cabinet security e national advisor, gchq themselves, and dinas committee. we've consulted more than 100 times with the agencies in order be aware of their concerns before we published them. so i suppose my question is, have you gone through all of 53,000 documents? and have some been excluded from publication? will they not be appearing. have others been put in the yes, publication? >> i think -- in terms of ublishing documents, i think we've published 26. >> i'm referring to the ones yet been. not >> we did a few more pages of ocuments that have been redacted. publishnot expect us to a huge amount of more. 26 over six months. the ones that have been communicated to the united states. because i understand some of hose, the names have been redacted and some of them haven't. how did you go about deciding names to redact and which not -- the guardian ear, has not used any names. in the rare occasion where we've used individual slides from documents which had names on them, we absolutely redacted those. it's been s
, and with the pentagon. this country it's included downing street, the cabinet office, the national security advisor, gchq themselves, and the dinas committee. we've consulted more than 100 times with the agencies in order to be aware of their concerns before we published them. >> and so i suppose my question is, have you gone through all of the 53,000 documents? and have some been excluded from publication? will they not be appearing. have others been put in the yes, okay for publication? >> i think -- in terms of publishing documents, i think we've published 26. >> i'm referring to the ones which have not yet been. >> we did a few more pages of documents that have been redacted. i would not expect us to publish a huge amount of more. 26 over six months. >> what about the ones that have been communicated to the united states. because i understand some of those, the names have been redacted and some of them haven't. how did you go about deciding which names to redact and which not -- >> let's be clear, the guardian has not used any names. in the rare occasion where we've used individual slides from
the defense intelligence agency and other about who we are all we're doing a behalf of national security for this country. it will give you some idea about the direction of one of the, what i would call the big five agencies that we have that are every day right now at 24 hours a day, seven days a week from some 142 countries around the world, of approximately 17,000 people coming in now, doing the nation's business. we have some extra neri and talented men and women out there. i will talk a little bit about that. first, thank you very much. wanted thank you for that great in kind of interaction. wanted thank these two and a staff that is here at pets these things on. it is an important endeavor that we keep doing this. the history of world politics in your personal dedication tustin this annual lecture is a testament to the commitment to train in a generation of critical thinkers and the professionals in this from a recognized the value of studying history when confronting modern issues of national security and world politics. as early as 1932, there was a book called the great pacific
that the fbi with the nsa, the national security council and the pentagon. it is this country that is included to street, the cabinet office, national security adviser. so we have consulted on more than 100 times with the agencies . >> have you gone through the 53,000 documents and will they not be appearing to the publication? >> as i said, we have in terms published documents. i think we've published 26. and we've published a few more individual pages, which have been good. i would not be inspecting a to be published in a huge more amount of documents. >> and what about the ones which have been communicated to the united states? i understand some of the names of the redact did in some of it hasn't. how did you go about deciding which aims to be redacted? let's be clear about this. "the guardian" has not use names. there's the rare occasion where we use individual flag from documents, which has names on it. we absolutely redact today. it has been said we use names. we didn't use names. >> i asked when you communicated that document in the united states and in some cases and documents you did
to restrict the surveillance by the national security agency? >> i would like to apply the fourth amendment to third party records. so when i have a contract with a phone company, i think those are still my records and you can look at them if you're from the government if you ask a judge. a warrant applies to one person. not to everyone in america. it's absolutely against the spirit and the letter of the fourth amendment to say that a judge can write one warrant and you can get every phone call in america and that's what's happening. i think it's wrong. it goes against everything america stands for and i will help to fight that all the way to the support. we need to get the supreme court to re-examine our records. >> so, you would ban if you could, all mass data mining. >> i'm for going after terrorists with every tool we have. i'm not opposed to the nsa, to spying, but i am infavor of the fourth amendment. if you think someone's a terrorist, you call a judge, get a warrant. if that's person's called 100 people, you get 100 more warrants. if they've called 10,000 people, you've got to get 1
. the letter follows information leaked by former national security agency contract for edward snowden, who leaked details of the secret programs. >> the nation's largest gay rights group says that corporate support for gay and trans and gender workers is reaching new course in the country. the a human- rights campaigner, but more than two-thirds of fortune 500 companies and 90% all the large employers its survey are not offering spousal benefits to the same sex the domestic partners. the group's 12th and will corporate quality index also found a record number of business is adopting the policy prohibiting discrimination against trans gender workers in job applications. >> the merger of american airlines and u.s. air ways has formed an air travel giant larger than the current industry leader, denied continental holdings. the new company will be called american airlines. passengers likely will not see this merger e. neely. ticketing and frequent flyer programs are expected to be combined. >> watching gas prices this morning. and the average price for a gallon of regular gasoline is up 3ยข. a
for the colombia site. loosh b -- looking to other concerns to the u.s., have the national security agencies had relations between the colombia and the u.s.? >> we have been sharing information on this for a long time. colombia's very particular country in the sense that we share with the u.s. and other intelligence agencies, all the information, and, therefore, we have spied on our common enemy ies. it has been done with a cooperation of the colombia authorities and the u.s. authorities. now, i don't know of information of spying outside that sphere of cooperation. if i knew about that, then, of course, i would condemn it immediately. >> some of your neighbors in latin america, of course, have been infuriated by revelations of u.s. eves dropping. is their anger justified? >> well, nobody likes to be spied, and i think, yes, nor somebody spies on you, you have all the right to get mad, and so they have all the right to get mad. they are spied without commission. >> looking to china, china's investment in latin america, of course, continues to grow, and the country signed more than 50 bilateral c
are and what we are doing on behalf of national security. to give you some idea about the 5irection of one of the big agencies that we have that are every day, 24 hours a day, seven days a week in 142 countries around the world with 17,000 people, doing the nation's business. we have some talented men and women and i will talk about them. john, thank you very much. i want to thank for the great introduction. i want to thank the institute of world politics and the staff that puts these things on. it is important that we keep doing i think it is a really important endeavor that we keep doing this. politicstute of world and your personal dedication to hosting this annual lecture is a testament to the institute's commitment to training a new generation of critical thinkers. the professionals in this room who recognize the value of studying history when confronting modern issues of national security and world politics. as early as 1932, there was a which begins with a surprise attack on pearl harbor. part of the curriculum. i have a graduate degree. in march of 1931, intelligence reports warn o
." the letter follow revelations by former national security agency contractor edward snowden, who leaked details of the secret programs that critics say violate privacy rights >> i will highlight more of the weather when we return. >> ice, snow, and cold weather are causing problems all over the country. in addition to stranding numerous drivers and causing thousands of flight cancellations, andrew spencer reports the wintry storms are causing damage. >> it looks like an onion lucky place for you to have parked your car. it did not happen just once, rooftops were so heavy that have allegis failed to the street. take a look at some of the damage. the interstate was shut down does not see snow especially not like this. many drivers in little rock, ark. are used to the ice conditions. >> the residential areas are not clear. >> take a look at this the view from this error plane. across the country the weather cost thousands of flights to be canceled. so many people were stuck in dallas that they started to provide food for them. even the white house and the capital got a little bit of a dust
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)